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August 12 at 11:01am

NYC: When Will The Next Bus Arrive?

It’s about time. Now if they only would do it for subways too. And maybe people can be trained not to walk down into the subway when they see people coming up (don’t they know a train has just arrived and left the station?!).

Electronic count down displays with expected arrival times will be placed along 34th street:
http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/11/miracle-on-34th-street-your-bus-arrival-time/
How come this can’t exist everywhere?


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July 20 at 12:29pm

Subway Improvement Idea #3

Back in June, I posted an idea (or rather two) on how to improve the NYC Subways.  I still haven’t found the MTA suggestion box, but I do have a NYC Subway Improvement Idea for July.  This time it’s just a borrowed idea from my travels.  

Why can’t we have LED signs that let expectant passengers know when the next train is expected to arrive?  Was it London that I saw them in?  Vienna?  Or just all of Europe?  And where can I find a photo of this sign so the blog can look all nice & pretty?


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July 11 at 6:54am

Change the Urban Landscape

Being a city-dweller, I was a fan of congestion pricing to reduce traffic, but I understand why it could not pass for NYC in the state capitol.  Nonetheless I like the stick-to-it-ness of the mayor to find ways to make the city greener.  

I am not sure if I would have started with Broadway between 42nd – 34th Street as my next urban park, but I dig the idea.
Read about it here in the NY Times.


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June 15 at 12:30pm

Virtual Front



Last weekend I was walking home and saw that one of the stores in my neighborhood had been cloned and flattened.  I greatly enjoyed the marketing prank and looked forward to the punch line the next day, not yet sure what they were selling.  Sure enough, the butcher was back on Monday, it’s full dimensionality entact, albeit a little eyesore in the window completing the marketing.  A lot of work for the few who saw it, but I appreciated my glimpse.

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June 3 at 2:01pm

NYC Subway Stair Congestion Problem

You’d think people would recognize that when there is a swarm of people coming up the subway stairs, it means that a train has recently arrived.  Which also usually means that same train has left the station, so there is no reason for them to go down the stairs until everyone else has exited.  But the people don’t seem to realize this and it just isn’t going to happen.

I have a few ideas on this subject (being the subway problem not the realization one),  but a simple (and inexpensive) solution would probably be to just paint a yellow line down the center of the stairs.  People would presumably get it that one side is for up and one side is for down.  If they need some help, an arrow could be painted on each side to indicate up or down.  If they need further help, arrows could be painted on the corresponding wall.
I recognize that this is not the most efficient use of the stairs as all the space is not being used for the most pressing need (i.e. for going up on exiting, or down when a train is arriving), and I have a few good ideas on how that could be better done too.
There’s got to be an MTA suggestion space somewhere…


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June 1 at 9:58pm

NYC Park Litter Collection

It’s a beautiful day in New York.  We like everyone else, seemed to be out walking.  We went through quite a few bottles of water.  And then just threw them in the trash.

How come NYC subway stations and parks don’t have trash containers that separate paper, bottles, and general garbage?  Would it be that hard to do?  Are there good examples of how other cities do it?
It was also just pointed out to me that the MTA has started a campaign to discourage people from leaving their paper on the train — a practice that I was always appreciative of (unless I found the bubblegum surprise stuck in the middle).  The absurdity of this campaign however is that instead of providing recycling bins, the MTA tells you throw the papers in the trash (along with your bottles and bubblegum).


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